How to make Zoom or Google Meet video calls on a big screen TV

Most people are used to taking Zoom or Google Meet calls on their smartphones or laptops. But if you have a group of people sitting in a conference room on the same call with another person on the other end of the line, it can be space-saving and inconvenient. Having video calls on a big screen TV is much better for everyone than huddling around a smartphone or laptop screen.

However, taking video calls on TVs is not yet widely supported. Most televisions, standard or smart, don’t have built-in cameras and microphones for obvious good reasons; no one wants their television to spy on them. TV suppliers have therefore avoided including built-in cameras and microphones in their televisions. However, that is changing with the latest Amazon Smart TV Omni series that works with built-in Alexa.

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Okay for now, you’ll need a laptop or smartphone that’s connected or projected on your TV to make video calls.

Miracast, Chromecast and Apple AirPlay 2

To take video calls using your TV, your TV must support Apple Miracast, Chromecast, or AirPlay 2. These features allow you to connect wirelessly. screen mirror Where to throw your smartphone screen or app to the TV wirelessly via WiFi. Your TV must either support these standards – and most smart TVs – or be connected to a streaming player such as the Google Chromecast for Miracast / Chromcast support or Apple tv for AirPlay.


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Some smart TVs support AirPlay, such as Roku TVs running OS above 9.0, Samsung FHD / HD 4, 5 series (2018), Samsung UHD 6, 7, 8 series (2018, 2019, LG OLED (2019), etc. Check your manual to find out which standard is supported.


Read more: How to use Apple AirPlay 2 and Homekit on Roku TVs


Taking video calls from a Windows PC to a TV

How many HDMI ports do you need on your TV

I think most people will want to use their Windows laptops to make video calls on their smart TVs. With a laptop, you can do this either wirelessly or with cables. The easiest way is to simply connect your laptop to your TV using an HDMI cable. It is very simple. It works most of the time. HDMI carries audio and video signals from your laptop to the TV using just one cable. All you need is a good webcam or a built-in Full HD camera on your laptop.

If you want to do it wirelessly, things are a bit tricky. You need your TV to be smart and support Miracast. Fortunately, most Smart TVs do this especially those running Android TV. But you want to check with your TV manual to confirm if Miracast is supported. A safe bet, however, is to connect the Google Chromecast dongle to your TV. It comes with support for Chromecast, a Google standard supported by thousands of apps for wireless media sharing to TVs. You can then stream video calls to your TV from your laptop the same way you do with Netflix, HBO, etc.

Make video calls from an Android smartphone to a TV

If you don’t want to use your laptop, you can just use your smartphone. Your smartphone already has a high-quality video camera and a good microphone. All Android smartphones support Miracast, so you can easily view mirror video calls from Zoom or Google Meet right on the big screen. As already mentioned, however, your TV must also support Mircast or Chromecast.


Read more: How to Stream Google Meet Video Calls to TV Using Chromecast


Make video calls from a MacBook or iPhone to a TV

If you want to take video calls wirelessly from your MacBook or iPhone or iPad to the TV, you need a TV that supports Apple AirPlay 2. But if you are using a MacBook, you can just connect it to the TV via HDMI. However, most MacBooks don’t have HDMI ports (with the exception of the 2021 MacBook Pros). So you need an HDMI dongle / adapter for this.

If you’re using an iPhone / iPad, you can do this wirelessly through AirPlay 2. Most Roku smart TVs already support AirPlay 2. If your TV doesn’t have AirPlay 2, you need to connect to an Apple TV box. Streaming if you have one.

Okay, so those are your options the next time you want to take calls on the Telly big screen. Do you have any other recommendations for us? Tell us in the comments section below.

Feature image: Unsplash.com


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